Hawick Cornets :
archives

1800-1849

This category contains 9 posts

1814 Walter Wilson and the Hanging in the Haugh

1814 was quite  a year for Walter Wilson to be Cornet, and the end of an era. The long Napoleonic wars seemed finally to be over – Napoleon had invaded Russia, and then retreated from Moscow, leading to a hundred French, German and Polish officers from his army coming to Hawick as prisoners of war … Continue reading

1846 James Smith and the Flood

Records of flooding in the Teviot Catchment go back many years,with a  recent speeding up of runoff through new agricultural drains and lack of buffering by wetlands.  For “new” read 1836, when one local claimed that “a little summer flood which took a fortnight or three weeks to run off previous, now completely runs out … Continue reading

1840 Charles Smith at the Races

The 1840 Common Riding was well reported and having carrid out the ceremonies of the day, retired to a well earned meal at the Tower Inn for the “more aged and grave citizens”, and the livelier do in the Town Hall, provided by Mrs Hay of the Crown Inn Living with Mrs Hay, and presumably … Continue reading

1847 Thomas Hay died aged 23

Thomas Hay, who was to be Cornet in 1847, was living in the Crown Inn on the High Street as a 12 year old in 1840, when Cornet Charles Smith and his followers were served a sumptuous dinner by the publican Mrs Ann Hay, helped no doubt by the young Thomas. The 1840 Common Riding … Continue reading

1808 William Beck

The Caledonian Mercury on 24 March 1808 carried an advert which would have been of interest to anyone wishing to have tweels, diaper, damask or cloth bleached at the Roslin Bleachfields. The proprietors promise that particular care is taken to preserve the fabric, and that a beautiful colour is given to the cloth, which would … Continue reading

1868 William Inglis and the Hawick Oil Refinery

William Inglis was the son of another father and son Cornet pairing: William senior in 1827, and William junior in 1868, so there was quite a time between them – 41 years. William senior, merchant, didn’t get married until late – in 1841 he was a 40 year old grocer at 64 High Street, unmarried … Continue reading

1834 Robert Beck, Third Class Clerk

I thought I would push my census sources as far as they would go, to the 1841 census , with a fair chance that I would be able to pick up a 25-30 year old  ex-1834 Cornet Robert Beck. I thought it would be easy -  William Beck’s Stocking Shop is now clearly seen on … Continue reading

1836 Thomas Kedie the third Kedie Cornet

Thomas Kedie was a baker, living at Kirkstyle, east side at the head of Silver St. The Exchange Bar is probably Victorian, but the houses look older as you go towards the church. However, they are on the West side, not the East side where Cornet Kedie was living. The 1824 Woods Map is only … Continue reading

1841 George Turnbull and the Auld Grey Yaud

Cornet George Turnbull, aged 21, was living in Allers Bank with his father John, a 43 year old “Seedsman Sp Dealer” in the census record – presumably an abbreviation for “Seedsman and Spirit Dealer” “Hawick Place Names” gives Allers Crescent being built in 1841 – after which the area looked like this But at the … Continue reading

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